“We don’t resolve all conflicts…we want to inspire dialogue…”

“The show is an “empowering intervention”. It is filled with archetypal images and situations. “It has to be familiar,” Prish explained, “it has to have happened in their lives, to make the connection so the messages can be gently slipped in.” She added “we don’t resolve all conflicts presented in the show, on purpose, because we want to inspire dialogue in the 30 minute facilitation session after the show.” Thus the show creates a space to look at a conflict that wasn’t resolved so that audience participants can ask why. We then ask them what they would do, and whether it would be the only thing that they could do, and how else a given conflict could potentially be resolved. According to Prish, the purpose of this process is to develop the idea of the students being active participants in their own lives, to develop an identity of self, and to develop a sense of empathy. The actors, who are both local and expat, are all trained facilitators.” — Extracted from the blog The View from Taiwan by Michael Turton, “BANG Event, a new source for young people.”

I’ve been criticizing and at the same time doing whatever I can to impact, the education in Taiwan. There could be (and are) numerous causes and background influences that result in status quo, but I really could point out one missing link: the lack of discussion in the everyday life. Americans/Canadians could discuss on everything and anything. Heck, one of the most talked about topics after a break had always been movies. From the plot of a movie, a strategy of a sport event, to a race, or even just people and things to do in life. And these discussions carried on into the dorms, with the house masters, and into the classrooms with the teachers, and so on.

Instead in Taiwan (or can I say sinographic region?), this whole Confucian-centric hierarchy pretty much dictates the correct answer, and at the same time silence the room for a “real debate.” So who’s to blame those college (or even post-grad) students that sit quietly in class?

I am fortunate enough to arrive Taiwan during college, where only remnants of “correct answer” loom. Yet at times when I tried to inspire others to think, I sometimes fell into the traps of “telling” instead of “initiating.”

This is why this BANG event article just seem that much more extraordinary and refreshing to me. They create scenes that are familiar with moments of life to correspond with the audience and capture the attention, then throws the question in the air to initiate the discussion. This is not uncommon; it just takes awareness. It reminds me of Wang Fu Productions and especially Strangers, again. Heck, one reason that Japanese comics, animations and drama series are so popular and could always be surrounded by diehard fans is because “they make people think and therefore inspire discussion!”

Enough said. I ma leave it to the words of Prish again.

” the purpose of this process is to develop the idea of the students being active participants in their own lives, to develop an identity of self, and to develop a sense of empathy”

Ain’t this the purpose of education?

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One Response to “We don’t resolve all conflicts…we want to inspire dialogue…”

  1. Kristin Brænne says:

    Stay excellent!

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